Hamilton

Hamilton (/ˈhæməltən/; 2011 population 519,949; UA population 670,580; CMA population 721,053) is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. Conceived by George Hamilton when he purchased the Durandfarm shortly after the War of 1812, Hamilton has become the centre of a densely populated and industrialized region at the west end of Lake Ontario known as the Golden Horseshoe. On January 1, 2001, the new City of Hamilton was formed through the amalgamation of the former city and the other constituent lower-tier municipalities of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth with the upper-tier regional government. Residents of the old city are known as Hamiltonians. Since 1981, the metropolitan area has been listed as the ninth largest in Canada and the third largest in Ontario. Hamilton is home to the shared Royal Botanical Gardens, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the Bruce Trail, McMaster University and Mohawk College. The Canadian Football Hall of Fame can be found downtown right beside Hamilton City Hall and across town to the east, the Canadian Football League‘s Hamilton Tiger-Cats will begin playing at the new Tim Hortons Field in 2014, which is being built as part of the 2015 Pan American Games. Partly because of its diverse environment, numerous TV and film productions have been filmed in Hamilton, regulated by the Hamilton Film and Television Office. A growing arts and culture sector garnered media attention in a 2006 Globe and Mail news article, entitled “Go West, Young Artist,” which focused on the growing art scene in Hamilton. The article highlighted local art galleries, recording studios and independent film production. * Information...

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Milton

Milton (2011 census population 84,362) is a town in Southern Ontario, Canada, and part of the Halton Region in the Greater Toronto Area. The town received a significant amount of attention after the 2006 and 2011 censuses indicated that Milton was the fastest growing municipality in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, with a 71.4% increase in population between 2001 and 2006, and a 56.4% increase in population between 2006 and 2011. In early 2012, the town’s planner estimated Milton’s population to be between 94,000 and 95,000. Milton is located 40 km (25 mi) west of Downtown Toronto on Highway 401, and is the western terminus for the Milton line commuter train and bus corridor operated by GO Transit. Milton is on the edge of Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO world biosphere reserve and the Bruce Trail. The town took root out of a settlement by Jasper Martin along the Sixteen Mile Creek; Martin immigrated from Newcastle, England with his wife Sarah and two sons on May 17, 1818. Martin was granted 100 acres (40 ha) of land, from the Crown in 1820, designated Lot 14, Concession 2, Township of Trafalgar, Halton County, in the District of Gore. Martin later built a grist mill along the creek and created a pond, known as Mill Pond, to power his mill. The mill became the centre of settlement for others as they settled in the region. In 1837 the area had a population of approximately 100 people and was named Mill Town. The town, as it is today, soon after became known as Milton. The two...

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Mitchell

Mitchell is a community in Perth County, Ontario, Canada. Mitchell is located at the intersection of Highways 8 and 23, 20 km west (and a little north) of Stratford, and 60 km north of London, in the municipality of West Perth. Mitchell was founded in 1836 by William Johnston, who laid out a town plot and local tavern, and John Hicks, one of the first settlers of the area, who erected a new hotel near the Thames River, where the historic Hicks House Hotel building (now restored with stores and apartments) in downtown Mitchell stands. A sawmill was built in 1842, as well as new stores and businesses, contributing to the town’s growth. In 1857, Mitchell was incorporated as a village, and in 1874, was incorporated as a town with a population of 2,000. On January 1, 1998, the town amalgamated with the neighbouring Townships of Logan, Fullarton, and Hibbert to form the new Municipality of West Perth. As of 2001, the former town of Mitchell has a population of 4,022. Mitchell Ontario was named after Mitchell Deyo of Ontario. * Information...

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Stratford

Stratford is a city on the Avon River in Perth County in southwestern Ontario, Canada, with a population of 30,886 as of 2011. When the area was first settled by Europeans in 1832, the townsite and the river were named after Stratford-upon-Avon, England. It is the seat of Perth County. Stratford was incorporated as a town in 1859 and as a cityin 1886. The first mayor was John Corry Wilson Daly and the current mayor is Dan Mathieson. The swan has become a symbol of the city. Each year twenty-four white swans and two black swans are released into the Avon River. The town is well known for being the home of the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. The town was originally a railway junction. Furniture manufacturing became an important part of the local economy by the twentieth century. In 1933 a general strike, started by the furniture workers and led by the Communist Workers’ Unity League, marked the last time the army was deployed to break a strike in Canada. The city’s economy took a major turn when the Stratford Shakespeare Festival started in 1953. The annual festival now brings hundreds of thousands of theatre goers and tourists to the area. Celebrities such as Alec Guinness, Christopher Plummer, Olivia McLean, Dame Maggie Smith, and William Shatner have performed at the festival. The Canadian novelist and playwright Timothy Findley performed in the first season, and had an ongoing relationship with the festival, eventually moving to Stratford in 1997. The world-renowned festival takes place in four theatres throughout the city: the Festival Theatre,...

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